Black History 101 Textbook: Ten Lessons: An Introduction to Black History. By purchasing the book, you can help support this educational institution.

Instructor: Mba Mbulu

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Class #7

Read pages 160 thru 180. The Outline to those pages and the next lesson appears below. Be able to expound on the following issues:

(1) These pages speak of an African Revolution. What is the relationship between the African Revolution and civil rights "gains" for Black People in the United States?

(2) Who is Patrice Lumumba? What happened to him?

(3) What influence did African liberation have on the civil rights movement in the United States?

(4) After the Reconstruction period, white people put Black People "back in their place." What does that mean? What does that say about the vulnerability of Black People in the United States?

(5) Compare the Black power exhibited by the African Revolution and the Black power exhibited by Blacks in the United States during the 1960s.

(6) How did political underhandedness and human brutality undermine the movement of Black People toward self-determination during this general time period?

(7) The following paragraph appears at the bottom of page 179. Do you think it is an overstatement?

"We cannot afford to take chances in these lessons, so we will repeat what was just said. In the American social structure, given a positive emotion, action or possibility (love or equality, for example) and a negative emotion, action or possibility (hate or racism, for example), the negative is the more powerful, the more persuasive, the more domineering. In a different type structure where positive emotions and thoughts are planted, nourished and tended, such would probably not be the case. It is important that We recognize that We do not presently live in the latter-mentioned type social structure. As such, it does little, if any, benefit at the moment to theorize or philosophize about such a structure. We should, instead, accept the fact that the reality exists and deal with the reality; the reality of the negative outweighing the positive, the reality of an oppressive economic structure, the reality of a powerful and dominant political concept and practice called racism, the reality of exploitation and discrimination, the reality of Black and white. Yes, We, Black People, must accept the reality of Black and white. We must, in Our minds and within Our thought processes, accept the reality of white people dominating Black People, of white people enjoying their domination of Black People, of white people doing whatever they feel is necessary to continue their domination of Black People. We must not allow a dream to interfere with Our ability to recognize this reality, nor can We allow an emotion to interfere with Our ability to act intelligently in the face of this reality. Visions of Black People and white people holding hands at some time in the future should not determine Our response to the racial abuse and exploitation of Black People today, and the fear of what might happen should Black People challenge the reality of racism alone (without the assistance of white people) should not cause Us to submit to that reality until white people are ready to challenge it. What is real is real, and We can only maintain what is real, change what is real or destroy what is real by first accepting the fact of its realness, its reality."

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Copyright 1980, 1996,1998, 1999 ASET, M. Mbulu All rights to everything on this web site are reserved.

LESSONS 7 & 8 OUTLINE (From Ten Lessons: An Introduction to Black History)

I. The U.S.A., 1870-1930: A Brief Summary

II. World History: World War II - 1970

A. Revolution in Africa

1. "Within a decade the African Revolution and its liberation movements have shattered the colonial empires." K. Nkrumah

B. Counter-Revolution in Africa

1. Destruction of Leaders 2. Military Audacity 3. Economic Boycotts/Destruction

C. Rebellion in the United States

1. "Civil Rights" rejected again by white people 2. Emphasis on "community control"

D. Revolution in the United States

1. Nation of Islam 2. Black Panther Party 3. Republic of New Afrika 4. Others

E. Counter-Revolution/Rebellion in the United States

1. Counter-Intelligence Program 2. LEAA (Law Enforcement Assistance Acts)

3. Government Illegalities 4. Gun Control 5. Other Abridgements of Rights

F. Self-Determination in the Caribbean

1. Cuba 2. Jamaica 3. Steps Toward Economic Interdependence

G. Counter-Revolution in the Caribbean

1. Military audacity 2. Economic Pressure 3. Political Underhandedness

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