Course Outline

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Title of Course: Black History 301: The History of Cuba

Mba Mbulu, Instructor

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CLASS SUMMARY SHEET

The history of the Caribbean, particularly the countries of Haiti and Cuba, are of extreme importance to Black People in the United States. Since Black People were enslaved and shipped to the so called "new world," the experiences of Black People in the Caribbean and Black People in the United States have so much in common that they must be studied as if they were a single process.

The Caribbean gives Us a clear snapshot of two opposing forces at work. One of those forces is white power, and the other force is Black Power. By studying the Caribbean one sees how easily white power has been able to dominate everybody except Black People. White power came to North and South America and wiped out the native populations, and was ready to rule without any serious competition from non-white people. But then white power transported Black People to the Americas for slave labor purposes. In so doing, white power placed within its midst a force that is as powerful as white power, a force that has more substance than white power, a force that white power could not overwhelm through its usual methods of military, economic and political violence.

The revolution of Black People in Haiti changed the course of Cuban history. After the Haitian Revolution crushed Europe's mythology of military superiority, Cuba was transformed into a devastating plantation economy. But because of the Haitian Revolution, Cuba learned how to put an end to its wretched condition. It is no accident that the Cuban War for Independence in the latter half of the 1800s and the Cuban Revolution in the 1950s have so much of substance in common with the Haitian Revolution in the late 1700s. And it is no accident that, at the turn of the 21st century, it is easy to find a Cuban who will say "I am not white," but difficult to find one who will say "I am not Black."

Black People in the United States, Black People in Haiti and Black People in Cuba can form an Axis of Dominance for Black Power in the Americas. The cultural and historical ties that bind the Black brothers and sisters spread throughout Haiti, Cuba and the United States are richer and run deeper than all others and are capable of utterly suffocating white power. Black People in the United States need to relearn and re-understand this family relationship. It is the purpose of this course to help Us do just that.

Black History 301: The History of Cuba

Classes

  Class #1 Why Native Americans Failed To Successfully Defend Themselves Against White People, Part 1
 Class #2 Why Native Americans Failed To Successfully Defend Themselves Against White People, Part 2
 Class #3 Why Native Americans Failed To Successfully Defend Themselves Against White People, Part 3
 Class #4 Why Native Americans Failed To Successfully Defend Themselves Against White People, Part 4
Class #5 The Unfortunate Discovery
 
Class #6 White Power Takes Control
 Class #7 The Black Infusion
 
Class #8 Becoming Cuban
 
Class #9 Economic Strangulation
 
Class #10 The War For Independence, Part 1
Class #11 The War For Independence, Part 2
Class #12 The United States Intervenes, Part 1
Class #13 The United States Intervenes, Part 2
Class #14 Seeds of Revolution
Class #15 The Revolution Matures
Class #16 Fidel Castro
Class #17 World Revolution

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