Title of Course: White History 101 Mba Mbulu, Instructor

Copyright 2000,2001 ASET, M. Mbulu All rights to everything on this web site are reserved. No duplication permitted.

Textbook: Mba Mbulu's Introduction to White History: The History of White America. Click here for purchase information.

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White History 101 Class #7

Click Here and read the extract from Mba Mbulu's Introduction to White History: The History of White America for this class. Also read pages 27 through 28 and 94 through 97 of the textbook, Mba Mbulu's An Introduction to White History. Think about what you read and be able to respond to the following questions.

(1) Why is it so important that Black nationalists in the United States understand the importance of persevering?
(2) Black nationalists have to learn how to understand failure. A failure should not be used as an excuse to give up, but as a stage in the learning process. Do you agree? Why or why not?
(3) For more than 100 years, white America's founding fathers failed. Yet, they succeeded in gaining control of the "new land." How many of the ones who were around at the beginning of the process were around when it became successful? what does that say to Black nationalists in the United STates and elsewhere?
(4) What "businesses in the guise of political units" are being referred to in this lesson?
(5) Since the masses of the people in the colonies were not allowed to play a part in the process that created the governments, is the everyday person bound by the social contracts and forms of political organization that were established in this country? Why and why not?

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Lesson #7: Perseverance and Social Contracts

The men who began the process of colonizing the new land were not the same as those who completed that process. More than 100 years of exploring empires and establishing outposts had been engaged in by Europeans before English settlers disembarked and established the first English settlement that was to survive in the new land. Several failures preceded the settling of Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, and each failure was dearly felt. But neither of the failures caused the early colonizers to lose sight of their objective. They persevered, and that is why, by the early 1730s, permanent English settlements stretched along the Atlantic coast from what is now the state of New Hampshire to that of Georgia. By the 1730s, each of these settlements, each of these individual and group proprietorships, had been organized into political units. Within another 40 year period, these businesses in the guise of political units were to evolve from colonial status to independent states, and declare the birth of the United States of America.

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Much is made of the social contracts, the agreements among the settlers in colony after colony, that were agreed upon during this early time period, the Mayflower Compact being an example. In fact, there was no social contract that either sought the involvement of or was meant to benefit the masses of the people who were to settle the colonies or the new land as a whole. The social contracts and forms of political organization that were established were agreements among certain men that were designed to benefit them only. They were based, for the most part, on the English Magna Carta, which was an elitist centric agreement between businessmen (barons, church leaders, etc.) and the king of England. Like the Magna Carta, the social contracts that the settlers entered into were spurred mostly by money matters, and they made it easier for individuals to relate to and interact with each other in a somewhat civil climate. These social contracts were not documents that proposed or confirmed the equality of all people. As a matter of fact, at the time of the settling of the new land, equality was as far away from the minds of the English colonizers as it was from the minds of King John and the merchants who agreed to the Magna Carta nearly 400 years earlier.

More will be mentioned on the Magna Carta and related "contracts" (forms of government) later, particularly when we discuss the U. S. constitution. We need to pay a great deal of attention to them because they demonstrate that the governments that were established by the early settlers and colonizers lacked legitimacy. Since the masses of the people in the colonies were not allowed to play a part in the process that created the governments, they were not bound by the dictates and laws enacted by those governments. If the settlers who populated the new land in the beginning had been able to reason as such, the development of the United States of America could have been markedly different.

Copyright 2000,2001 ASET, M. Mbulu All rights to everything on this web site are reserved. No duplication permitted.

 

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